Lumbar Laminectomy

LUMBAR LAMINECTORY

This is a surgical procedure performed to treat the symptoms of central spinal stenosis or narrowing of the spinal canal. This surgery involves removal of all or part of the posterior part of the vertebra (lamina) to provide more space for the compressed spinal cord and/or nerve roots. Lumbar laminectomy is considered after nonsurgical treatments such as physical therapy, medications and/or epidural steroid injections have been tried without improvement.https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lumbar-decompression-surgery/

TYPES OF LUMBAR LAMINECTOMY

  • Bilateral laminectomy – this is where both sides of the lamina of the affected vertebra are removed.
  • Unilateral laminectomy – a part of or the entire lamina on one side of the affected vertebra is removed.

THE AIM OF LUMBAR LAMINECTOMY IS TO:

  • Relieve tissue compression by widening the spinal canal
  • Improve leg function by decreasing pressure on the nerves, this in turn reduce leg pain and potentially improve weakness and functionality of the lower back and legs.

RECOVERY AFTER LUMBAR SURGERY

Recovery will depend on your fitness and level of activity prior to surgery.

After minor laminectomy (decompression) you can usually be able to do desk work and light activities within few weeks. If you had spinal fusion, recovery time will likely be longer, you may not be able to lift and bend for 3 months or more.

Start light walking exercises and physical therapy exercises as soon as your doctor says you are ready. This will help speed the recovery.

You may not know if your back is better until 6 weeks or more after surgery.

Below is the guide to the approximate length of time before you may return to sporting activities following laminectomy and/or decompression:

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