back pain, L5-S1 herniation, sciatica, slipped disc

CAUSES OF TINGLING FEELING IN UPPER BACK, CAUSES OF TINGLING FEELING IN MIDDLE BACK AND CAUSES OF TINGLING FEELING IN LOWER BACK

A tingling feeling in the back is commonly describes as a pins-and-needles, stinging or “crawling” sensation. Depending on its cause and location, the feeling can be chronic (long term) or short live (acute). Seek immediate medical attention if the tingling is accompanied by (a) sudden weakness in the legs (b) problems in walking and (c) loss of control of bladder or bowel.

TINGLING FEELING IN UPPER BACK

Tingling feeling in upper back is commonly caused by nerve compression, nerve damage or nerve irritation. Some causes include:

  • Cervical radiculopathy. This is a pinched nerve that occurs in the spine within the neck. This occurs when one of the shock-absorbing discs that lies between each vertebra (the bones of the spine) collapses, bulges or herniates, pressing against sensitive nerve. This often happens due to aging or improper body mechanics. Most cases heal with rest, over-the-counter pain relievers and physical therapy. https://cks.nice.org.uk/neck-pain-cervical-radiculopathy
  • Fibromyalgia. This is a disorder of central nervous system that produces widespread muscle pain and fatigue. Pain, ranging from dull and achy to tingling and is often worse in area where there is a lot of movements such as the shoulders and neck. This condition if often treated with pain relievers, anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxers, antidepressants which can help relieve pain and symptoms of depression that occur when living with fibromyalgia. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/fibromyalgia/
  •  Brachial plexopathy. The brachial plexus is a group of nerves in the spinal column that send signals to the shoulders, arms and hands. If these nerves are stretched or compressed, a stinging, tingling pain can develop. In most cases the pain is felt in the arm briefly. The stinging can radiate around the neck and shoulders. Treatment involves pain medications, steroids to reduce inflammation and physical therapy. https://www.evidence.nhs.uk/search?q=brachial+plexus
  • Lhermitte’s sign. This is a shock-like sensation linked to multiple sclerosis (MS). The pain usually lasts only seconds but can reoccur. There is no specific treatment for Lhermitte’s sign although steroids and pain relievers are common treatments. https://www.mstrust.org.uk/a-z/lhermittes-sign

TINGLING FEELING IN MIDDLE BACK

Tingling feeling in middle back may be caused by shingles. Shingles is an infection caused by the same virus that produces chicken pox (varicella zoster virus). It affects the nerve endings. Once you’ve had chicken pox, the virus can lie dormant in your system for years. If it becomes reactivated, it appears as a blister rash that often wraps around the torso producing a tingling or burning pain. Treatment includes pain relievers, antiviral medications, anticonvulsants, steroids, antidepressants and numbing topical sprays, creams and gels. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/shingles/

TINGLING FEELING IN LOWER BACK

Tingling feeling in lower back can be due to one of the following:

  • Spinal stenosis. This is a narrowing of the spinal column. This narrowing can trap or pinch nerve roots. Spinal stenosis becomes more common as people age. This condition can be treated with pain relievers, anti-inflammatories, muscle relaxers, steroids. https://www.evidence.nhs.uk/search?q=spinal+stenosis
  • Herniated disc. This can occur anywhere along the spine. However, the lower back is a common place. Treatment consist of rest, ice, pain relievers, physical therapy. https://www.evidence.nhs.uk/search?ps=20&q=slipped+disc
  • Sciatica. The sciatic nerve runs from the lower back into the buttocks and legs. When the nerve is compressed, which can be causes by spinal stenosis or herniated disc or injury on spine, a tingling pain can be felt in your legs. To relieve pain a doctor may prescribe anti-inflammatories, pain killers, muscle relaxers, antidepressants. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/sciatica/

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