coccydynia, Coccyx, coccyx or tailbone pain

COCCYX PAIN

In general, coccyx pain is caused by injury. Coccyx injuries are due to direct impact from a fall onto your bottom. The severity of the injury can range from a bruise to a fracture. Most coccyx injuries heal on their own given time and self-management.

Below are some of the advice to help people with coccyx pain:

  • People with coccyx pain are advised to avoid sitting for long periods, so if you can stand during the day, that is recommended. If you must sit, leaning forward will take some of the pressure off your coccyx.
  • Some people find sitting on a “coccyx cushion”, which has a U-Shaped design at the back, helps to avoid weight bearing on the coccyx while sitting.
  • Cold compression can be applied for up to 20 minutes at a time, several times throughout the day.
  • Simple pain killers such as paracetamol and/or ibuprofen can be very effective for helping with pain and swelling, but don’t use them for more than 2 weeks without seeking medical advice.
  • Exercises. It is important to keep your lumbar spine moving normally. The exercises below will help to gently maintain or regain normal movement:
  • (a) Extension Facing Wall. Stand, leaning against a wall with your feet 30 cm (1 foot) from the wall. Puch your stomach and pelvis towards the wall and hold for 5 seconds before returning to the start position. Repeat 2-3 times each hour. (Note – if your stomach touches the wall, move your feet backwards a little for the next stretch.
  • (b) Side Flexion in Standing. Stand with your arms by your side. Slowly slide one hand down the outside of your leg so you feel a stretch. Slowly return to the upright position and repeat to the opposite side. Repeat 2-3 times every hour.
coccyx or tailbone pain

COCCYX PAIN

Pain in the coccyx (or tail bone) is generally due to injury. At times pain in the coccyx can be caused by degenerative changes in your body. Some coccyx pain can be due to seating on top of a hard surface for a prolonged period of time. The severity of injury can range from a bruise to a fracture. Injury can be due to direct impact from a fall onto your bottom.

The following may help reduce the coccyx pain:

Coccyx

5 HOME REMEDIES FOR COCCYX PAIN OR TAILBONE PAIN

(1) Avoid sitting down on hard surface for long periods of time. When sitting on hard surface lean forward and direct weight away from the tailbone.

(2) Purchase a U-shaped memory foam seat cushion. This cushion helps to avoid direct painful contact against the coccyx area.

(3) Use NSAIDs (Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) for pain control.

(4) Eat foods high in fibre to soften stools and avoid constipation, which can sometimes cause worsening pain in the coccyx area.

(5) For traumatic injuries, apply ice to the tailbone area for 15-20 minutes, four times a day, for first few days after the injury.

Coccyx

COCCYX PAIN

Pain in the coccyx (or tail bone) is generally due to injury. The severity of injury can range from a bruise to a fracture. Injury can be due to direct impact from a fall onto your bottom. Some sports, such as cycling or rowing can increase the risk of coccyx pain due to repetitive pressure or friction on the coccyx.

The following may help reduce the coccyx pain:

image of a specially designed coccyx cushion, U-Shaped at the back to prevent pressure on your coccyx or tailbone when sitting on top of this cusion
100% memory foam cushion
  • (2) avoid prolonged sitting whenever possible – try to stand up and walk around regularly, leaning forward while seated may also help.
  • (3) wear loose-fitting clothes – avoid clothing such as tight jeans or trousers that may put pressure on your tailbone.
  • (4) cold packs and warm pack.
  • (5) try laxatives (medicines to treat constipation) if the pain is worse when you’re having a poo – many laxatives are available to buy from pharmacies and supermarkets without prescription.
  • (6) take over-the-counter painkillers. If the pain and discomfort is not too severe, it may be relieved with over-the-counter pain killers known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) which are available without a prescription. However, some people cannot take NSAIDS because they’re allergic to them or have an increased risk of developing stomach ulcers. If this is the case, try taking paracetamol instead. Ask a pharmacist or GP for advice if you’re unsure what to take.