back pain, Back pain from prolapsed disc

BACK PAIN FROM SLIPPED OR PROLAPSED DISC

One of the medical condition that can cause back pain is slipped or prolapsed disc (a disc of cartilage in the spine pressing on a nerve) – this can cause back pain and numbness, tingling and weakness in other parts of the body.

A slipped disc is when a soft cushion of tissue between the bones in the spine pushes out. It’s painful if it presses on nerves. It usually gets better slowly with rest, gentle exercise and painkillers.

HOW TO EASE THE PAIN FROM SLIPPED DISC?

KEEP ACTIVE
If the pain is very bad, you may need to rest at first. But start gentle exercise as soon as you can – it will help you get better faster. The type of exercise is not important, just gradually increase your activity level.

TAKE PAINKILLERS
Take pain killers regularly (up to the recommended daily amount) rather than just when the pain is particularly bad. This will help you to keep moving.

WHEN TO SEE THE DOCTOR?

See your doctor when:

  • your painkillers are not helping
  • the pain is no better after a month
  • you have a very high temperature or you feel hot and shivery
  • you have unexplained weight loss
  • you have swelling in your back
  • the pain is worse at night
back pain, headache

WHAT CAUSE BACK PAIN AND HEADACHE TO OCCUR AT THE SAME TIME?

Below is the list of conditions that can cause back pain and headache to occur at the same time:

(1) POOR POSTURE

Poor posture can put a strain on the muscles of your head and back. Maintaining poor posture over time can lead to the development of both headache and back pain.

(2) INJURY

Car accident, fall, or injury while playing sports, can cause headache and back pain to occur together.

(3) INFECTIONS

Meningitis and encephalitis often cause back pain and headache together. Meningitis is an inflammation of the tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue. Other symptoms that can occur during meningitis and encephalitis includes, but not limited to, flu-like symptoms, high fever, stiff neck, neck pain, photosensitivity to light.

(4) MIGRAINE

Intense, throbbing headache my lead to lower back pain.

(5) IBS

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a gastrointestinal disorder that can cause symptoms like abdominal cramps, constipation and diarrhoea. IBS can also cause headache and back pain.

(6) BRAIN ANEURYSM

A brain aneurysm occurs when the walls of an artery in the brain become weakened and begin to bulge. If the aneurysm ruptures, it can be life-threatening. Symptoms can include, but not limited to, sudden severe headache, neck stiffness or neck pain, back pain, double vision. If you think someone has a brain aneurysm an ambulance has to be called and the person has to be taken to the nearest emergency department. https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/headaches/ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/back-pain/

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR?

You need to see a doctor if your headache and back pain:

  • are severe,
  • does not get better with rest or home treatment,
  • returns or occurs more often than usual,
  • affects your normal day-to-day activity.